Preparedness and Planning

Preparedness and Planning
• Step One: Participatory Design & Community Engagement
• Step Two: Know the Threat
• Step Three: Designing for Safety

Resource Links:
Preparedness Programs and Resources for School Administrators (Child Care, K-12, Higher Education)
http://www.caloes.ca.gov/for-individuals-families/school-emergency-planning-safety

Technology: Communication Goal

Technology: Communication Goal
• Right Information to the
• Right People at the
• Right Time so they can make the
• Right Decisions and issue the
• Right Communications.

Resource Links:
School safety, Security and Emergency preparedness
https://www.nsba.org/services/school-board-leadership-services/school-safety-and-security

Technology: Avoiding Risks

Technology: Avoiding Risks
• Overlapping and unconnected tools, data streams, interfaces, and teams can slow any organization’s response to a critical event when minutes count. Enabling fast communication among key participants can help bring about a more integrated response to emergencies.

Resource Links:
You Better Make These Schools Safe’: As School Starts, Violence Is Top of Mind
https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/08/30/you-better-make-these-schools-safe-as.html

Policy: Student Policies

Policy: Student Policies
• School level-

  • Working to be inclusive of all others
  • Awareness of security breaches
  • Taking shelter in place
  • Classroom and school evacuations – cooperating with first responders

Resource Links:
School Safety & Crisis
http://www.nasponline.org/resources-and-publications/resources/school-safety-and-crisis

Policy: Student Policies

Policy: Student Policies
• District level-

  • Training staff on the use of physical security measures/systems provided in each school
  • Addressing bullying among staff and students –“Rachel’s Challenge” and “Sandy Hook Promise” programs are examples
  • Training with local law enforcement officials on various disaster scenarios

Resource Links:
Threat Assessment: Predicting and Preventing School Violence
http://www.naspcenter.org/factsheets/threatassess_fs.html

 

Here’s How To Prevent The Next School Shooting, Experts Say
https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2018/03/07/590877717/experts-say-here-s-how-to-prevent-the-next-school-shooting

Policy: School Level ERP Plan

Policy: School Level ERP Plan

• Executable plans to recover from disasters
• Completion of a BCP (Business Continuity Plan)
• BCPs also provide a framework for communicating with staff, suppliers, customers, and stakeholders during a disaster. Having a plan in place makes it more likely that crisis response will run smoothly, maximum service levels are maintained, and schools recover as quickly as possible.
• School level response and recovery must focus on the requirements of each school, not the solution

  • People: Who are the key stakeholders that keep schools operational?
  • Decisions: What are the critical decisions that need to be made in the event of disruption?
  • Facilities: Where can the school carry out essential functions should the primary space be unavailable?
  • Resource: What are the services and supply needs of each school?
  • Technology: How would you carry out school functions if the data network is not available?

Resource Links:
The final report and findings of the safe school initiative: Implications for the prevention of school attacks in the United Sates
https://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/preventingattacksreport.pdf

 

Threat Assessment in Virginia’s Public Schools: Model Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines
https://www.dcjs.virginia.gov/sites/dcjs.virginia.gov/files/publications/law-enforcement/threat-assessment-model-policies-procedures-and-guidelinespdf.pdf